LYH66: How to Raise Your Children to be Leaders (Part 3) [Podcast]

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Show Agenda

  • Featured Presentation: How to Raise Your Children to be Leaders (Part 3)

Featured Presentation

Welcome to this final part in this series on raising your children to be leaders. In the first two parts, we examined what it takes as parents to develop children who are leaders in their generation. And, we have discussed the importance of having an individualized lens as we train our children—adapting our efforts to  their unique gifts. The first two lessons focus on the action that we are encouraged to take in training our children. This final part, however, helps us as parents to accept or live with the choices our children make and the direction God moves them.

In our feature scripture (Proverbs 22:6), we parents are instructed to “Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it.”

The final part of this verse  is the payoff. Ultimately, taking a healthy stance toward your child’s own leadership development may best be accomplished through 10 best practices that encourage the psychological and relational maturation necessary to become the leader that God has ordained.

10 Best Practices to Help Your Child to Spiritually Mature

  1. Show love
  2. Maintain a long-term perspective
  3. Stay present in the moment (appreciate life’s seasons)
  4. Don’t overreact
  5. Adapt your style of engagement to their life stage (Know when to let go)
  6. Be a guidepost (stay consistent)
  7. Pray for them daily
  8. Encourage incremental improvement
  9. Give yourself grace (forgive yourself)
  10. See yourself as a student (you are developing as a leader too)

I’d love to hear what you have taken from this series. Which of these things do you find easiest and most difficult to implement? Leave a comment.

Get your FREE copy of the “10 Proven Steps to Extraordinary Influence” at haroldarnold.com

Please do me a huge favor and click HERE to go to iTunes and leave me a rating and review. It will only take 2 minutes of your time. And, it means so much to me. And, just for you, I’ll give you a shout out on the next show.

How to Raise Your Child to be a Leader (Part 2)

In Part 1 of this series, I made a bold, maybe even controversial, assertion that all children are natural born leaders. Accepting this claim requires us to think more clearly as to what leadership really entails. Leadership is simply the art of influence. As indicated by scripture (Ephesians 2:10) our children were created to do good words which God prepared in advance for them to do. The duty of parenting is then to create a leadership culture in your home. In Part 2, we closely examine the importance of tailoring this leadership planning based on your child’s gifts.

Based on the biblical guidance in Proverbs 22:6, parents are instructed to “Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it.” In Part 1, we examined the first part of this instruction. What exactly does it mean to “train up a child”? As noted, it is best captured in three admonitions.

  • Teach them to know their Creator
  • Teach them to walk worthy of their Christian heritage
  • Teach them to discern and pursue their life’s purpose

LYH65: How to Raise Your Children to be Leaders (Part 2) [Podcast]

Play

Show Agenda

  • Featured Presentation: How to Raise Your Children to be Leaders (Part 2)

Featured Presentation

The duty of parenting is to create a leadership culture in your home. In Part 2 of this three part series, we closely examine the importance of tailoring this leadership planning based on your child’s gifts. Based on the biblical guidance in Proverbs 22:6, parents are instructed to”Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it.” In Part 1, we examined the first part of this instruction. This episode dives deeper in examining a key qualifier in how a parent is to train up a child—which is based on knowing “the way he should go”.  This qualification is critical because it gets to the uniqueness of your child. You cannot employ a same size fits all approach to parenting.
Here are the five ways to train up a child in the way he should go.
  • Step 1: Follow the signs
  • Step 2: Support core subjects
  • Step 3: Focus on strengths
  • Step 4: Push more social
  • Step 5: Embrace the struggle
Be sure to tune in next week for part 3 of this series where we will focus on the final part of this verse, “and when he is old he will not depart from it”.  Looking forward to sharing these insights with you.

Get your FREE copy of the “10 Proven Steps to Extraordinary Influence” at haroldarnold.com

Please do me a huge favor and click HERE to go to iTunes and leave me a rating and review. It will only take 2 minutes of your time. And, it means so much to me. And, just for you, I’ll give you a shout out on the next show.

How to Raise Your Children to be Leaders (Part 1)

Are you raising your children to be leaders? For years, my literal prayer has been that God bless my children to be leaders in their generation. At first, my wife pushed back saying “who says that they want to be leaders?” I understood her question and her point. She did not want me to project my own aspirations onto our children. She wants them to become who God intends for them to be not necessarily who I want them to be. And, she didn’t want them to feel pressured to pursue leadership. But, my wife was missing a premise that many other parents miss as well. To truly understand leadership is to grasp that within every child is a natural born leader. A primary parenting job is to pull your children’s leader nature forward. That is what it means for us as parents to be leaders of our respective homes. In this first of a three-part series, I will address this important topic with a particular faith-based lens to show you your role in bringing the leader forth in your children.

How to raise your child to be a leader

Ten Practices for A Father to Maximize His Influence on His Daughter

This past weekend, I traveled to my hometown state of Virginia for my baby sister’s baby shower. It was a festive time with family and friends. My sister and brother-in-law are expecting a little girl in early December. Her name is Kennedy. Yesterday I rubbed my sister’s belly and talked to Kennedy in utero. She kicked for Uncle Harold.  It’s exciting that another little girl will be joining our family. As I sat at the baby shower watching my brother-in-law, I thought about what a great father he will be. I’m very thankful that my sister has a husband that will be a strong presence for my niece. In fact, statistics clearly show the vital role that fathers play in the development of their daughters. But, we really don’t need statistics to understand how critically important a father’s attention is in the development of his daughter. For my nearly 17 years as the father of a young lady, I’ve sought to emphasize 10 practices that I believe are formative in her development as a young Christian lady. Many factors have impacted the amazing person that she is today. But, I believe these ten practices have played a critically important role.

Father hiking with daughter

Author Meg Meeker writes in her book, Strong Fathers, Strong Daughters: 10 Secrets Every Father Should Know [affiliate link], “fathers inevitably change the course of their daughters’ lives – and can even save them. From the moment you set eyes on her wet-from-the-womb body until she leaves your home, the clock starts ticking. It’s the clock that times your hours with her, your opportunities to influence her, to shape her character, and to help her find herself.” We fathers have a short window of time to maximally influence our daughters.

I love that excerpt for its emphasis on the short period of time that we fathers ultimately have to impress important values on our daughters. In our harried lives, it is easy to take these duties for granted. But, we do so at the peril of our daughters and our families more broadly.

Sometimes, we avoid these critical moments with our daughters because of difficulties we may have with her mother, particularly in divorce situations. Other times, it is because our daughters may not share our interests in certain activities (e.g. sports) or we in theirs (e.g., fashion trends). Still other times we have difficulty relating to some of the “girl drama” that may not seem nearly as serious as she purports it to be. Regardless of the reason, the result is that we fathers often outsource the male nurture of our daughters to those who often seek to exploit her.

Across developmental stages it only takes a glimpse at the statistics to glean a truism, a father’s influence on his daughter is irreplaceable. In other words, it cannot be effectively outsourced. Can a young girl develop into a fine woman without her father’s presence? Yes, of course. But, I believe it is the herculean effort of other family, friends, and community members that make that happen. Far too often, however, those resources simply aren’t sufficiently present.